Links

Shinto resources
Kokugakuin Encyclopedia of Shinto
Shinto Shrines (a website based on Joseph Cali and John Dougill’s guide to Shinto Shrines)
Mark Schumacher’s Shinto Guidebook  
(part of the excellent Photo Dictionary of Buddhism)
Sacred Sites in Japan
Shinto Online Network Association
Association of Shinto Shrines (jinja Honcho)
International Shinto Foundation
Timothy Takemoto’s Shinto blog
Heritage of Japan 
 (a wonderful resource of published articles about ancient Japan)

Mailing List
Shinto Mailing List (affiliated to the Shinto Online Network Association for general discussions)

International Shinto
Japanese Dutch Shinzen Foundation  (based in Amsterdam and run by Paul de Leeuw)
Tsubaki Grand Shrine of America  (based near Seattle and run by Rev. Barrish)
Hawaii Kotohira Jinsha–Dazaifu Tenmangu (based in Honolulu and run by Rev Masa Takizawa)
Texas Shinto Study Group (a community of Texans who study Shinto and practice misogi)

Sacred Texts
A list of useful links can be found here, including Kojiki, Nihongi, and Yengishiki
http://www.sacred-texts.com/shi/index.htm 

Introductions to Shinto
Japan National Tourism Organization
Japan Guide
California Polytechnic State University
Selected list of kami

Pantheism
World Pantheism

Kyoto-related
Deep Kyoto
Kyoto Journal
Hailstones haiku group

Japan general
Shiraishi Island (All about the Seto Inland Sea island by Amy Chavez)
Daruma san (Gabi Greve’s blog about Japanese culture)
More Glimpses of Unfamiliar Japan (OjisanJake’s wonderful photos)

 

Korean connections
David Mason’s San-shin Website

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Comments

Links — 4 Comments

  1. Hello

    I am fascinated by your blog, and would love your knowledge and assistance. I will be going to Japan next week, and want to be immeresed in a Shinto Shrine. My goal would be to learn their rituals, participate in their meditation and energy work, and volunteer my services in exchange for my stay. I am very focused on working towards full immersion into shamanic practices, yet most places I found are focuse on foreigners who just want to “experience” stay in a temple and rather look into a tourist stay observer. I am eager to work hard and learn, and would love your help in finding shrines that accept such workers.

    Look forward to hearing from you

    Thank you

    Astrid

    • Thank you for the query, Astrid. Unfortunately I do not know of any places that would take you on in the manner you suggest. As you say, shrines are willing to offer ‘experiences’ to foreigners such as a day’s visit, but not immersion or training. They take these things very seriously, and you would have to build up trust over a period of time by doing volunteer work, etc to show your commitment. It’s not something you could do on a short stay or vacation. On the other hand, should you meet the right priest who believes in you…

      • Hi John, I am a postgraduate student at the School of Oriental and African Studies and I am extremely excited by – and interested in – your work. I would love to contact you to discuss several things regarding Shinto, religious identity and ritualistic practice in – and outside of – Japan. I am writing a thesis on these particular issues. Please contact me via email if you have time, I would be extremely grateful.

        • Thank you for the message, and I will contact you privately by email. Your thesis sounds as if it will be of interest to a lot of people on the Green Shinto list.

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